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Photographs of da Vinci Code Paris

pictures of Saint-Sulpice Church, the musée du Louvre, l’arc du Carrousel, I.M. Pei’s Inverted Pyramid, pont du Carrousel, and the jardin des Tuileries, by photographer David Henry. Regardez cette page en français

«Impressions de France», a television show about the da Vinci Code phenomena in Paris, broadcast in Shanghai
Watch a TV show about the Da Vinci Code in which I appeared.

I was commissioned by Doubleday to take pictures for the special collectors’ illustrated edition of “The da Vinci Code”, by Dan Brown, a visual, guided tour through all the places mentioned in the novel, released November 2, 2004. Tom Reeves and Monique Wells wrote an article about what it was like taking pictures for this book.

Go to the main index of photographs of Paris, or take a look at pictures of… All of these pictures are available as high-resolution TIFF image files, and naturally, any of these pictures can be converted to black and white. Many others were taken at each photo shoot, so there are plenty of other choices if you don’t see exactly what you are looking for. Photography shoots can also be arranged in Paris and the surrounding regions…


The famous hotel, opened by César Ritz in 1896.

The Ritz Hotel in place Vendôme, Paris

An Arago medallion next to the Palais Royal, across from the Louvre Museum.

One of the Arago plaques that mark the Rose Line in Paris

The Arago line, named after astronomist Dominique François Jean Arago, runs under l’Observatoire de Paris, and dates from the observatory’s construction in 1672.

One of the Arago Medallions placed along Paris’ “Rose Line”

The Pyramide Inversée, designed by I.M. Pei, was conceived as a sort of a “chandelier”, spreading daylight through the Carousel du Louvre, the undergound shopping mall next to the Louvre Museum.

The Pyramide Inversée in the Carrousel du Louvre

The arch is on the axis that runs past place de la Concorde, on to arc de Triomphe

L’arc du Carrousel at the western end of the Louvre

The Pyramide Inversée, designed by I.M. Pei was conceived as a “flip” answer to the monumental pyramid entrance to the Louvre Museum.

The Carrousel du Louvre’s Pyramide Inversée

Where the Leonardo da Vinci’s “Madonna of the Rocks”, and Caravaggio’s “Death of a Virgin” are on display.

The floor of the Grande Galerie inside the musée du Louvre

The Pyramide Inversée is located behind I.M. Pei’s other, more-famous pyramid in Paris

The Pyramide Inversée next to the musée du Louvre

Where kids rent toy sailboats.

The central basin in the jardin des Tuileries

The entrance to the eastern side of the jardin des Tuileries

The eastern side of the jardin des Tuileries

The gates at the western end of the jardin des Tuileries

The gates at the western end of the jardin des Tuileries

Construction of Saint-Sulpice was started in 1646 by Christophe Gamart, then continued by Louis Le Vau.

The first level of Saint-Sulpice Church’s façade

Giovanni Nicolo Servandoni, an architect born in Florence, Italy, designed Saint-Sulpice’s façade in the classical style.

The second level of Église Saint-Sulpice’s façade

The southern tower of Saint-Sulpice was designed by Oudot de Maclaurin.

Saint-Sulpice Church’s southern tower

Construction of Saint-Sulpice was started in 1646, and was continued by architects Christophe Gamard, Louis Le Vau, Guittard et Gilles Marie Oppenord in the Jesuit style.

The façade of Saint-Sulpice church

The inscriptions in the upper-right hand corner originally said the astrolab was constructed thanks to the king and a few of his ministers, Jean-Frédérique Phélipeaux, Comte de Maurepas, and Philibert Orry, Directeur Générale des Bâtiments du Roi.

The plaque at the bottom of the astronomical gnomon, inside Saint-Sulpice Church

A beam of sunlight falls on the copper plaque in Saint-Sulpice Church, on the summer solstice.

The summer equinox plaque inside Saint-Sulpice church

The Astronomical gnomon in Saint-Sulpice was commissioned in order to determine the exact date of easter, and the winter and summer equinoxes.

The astronomical gnomon inside Saint-Sulpice church

The church is named after a priest of Bourge, a town which is also crossed by the meridian of Paris

The altar inside Saint-Sulpice church

This is the center of the church’s ceiling, viewed from just in front of the altar.

The ceiling inside église Saint-Sulpice

The ceiling inside église Saint-Sulpice between the organ and the center of the church, where the altar is located.

Saint-Sulpice church’s ceiling

Baudelaire and the Marquis de Sade were baptised in Saint-Sulpice

The chapel of the Holy Virgin, behind the high altar inside église Saint-Sulpice

Saint-Sulpice Church’s high altar, where Victor Hugo was married.

The high altar inside église Saint-Sulpice

A candle holder on the side of église Saint-Sulpice’s high altar.

A detail of the right-hand side of the altar inside Saint-Sulpice church

One side of arc de Triomphe seen from the champs-Élysées

The western façade of arc de Triomphe seen from the champs-Élysées

Sacré-Coeur was designed by Paul Abadie in a Romano-Byzantine style in 1875.

Montmartre by night: Basilique Sacré-Cœur

The entrance on the right hand side of Notre-Dame Cathedral’s main façade, known as the “Portal Saint-Anne”.

Cathédrale Notre-Dame’s southern doorway

Pont du Carousel was inaugurated in 1834 by king Louis-Philippe to celebrate the opening of the jardin des Tuileries.

Pont du Carousel, between the Louvre Museum and the Seine

Hector Lefuel constructed the guichets on the Louvre’s façade facing the river Seine, leading into place du Carrousel between 1861 and 1870.

The Guichet of the Louvre Museum, quai des Tuileries


Go to the home page of my web site

See the pictures I’ve taken in the United States

Take a look at the pictures I published in the Traveler’s Companion series of tourism/travel guide books, pictures of Canada, New England, and Mediterranean France

Jetlag and culture shock: Read my thoughts on what it is like taking pictures in Paris

See the pictures I’ve taken in England

Take a look at the pictures I have taken on trips to Italy

Photography workshops in Paris: Learn the secrets behind these pictures!

Portraits in Paris: with your family, friends and loved ones in the City of Lights, and the famous monuments of Paris in the background.

See the pictures I took on a trip through Alsace-Lorraine, France

What does all this new technology mean for photographers? Read my thoughts on this what this Brave New World means for visual artists.

Take a look at the pictures I took on a trip through Switzerland

See the pictures I’ve taken elsewhere in France